Top Tools and Technologies in Java Development Landscape

Top Tools and Technologies in Java Development Landscape

Top Tools and Technologies in Java Development Landscape

Top Tools and Technologies in Java Development Landscape 800 507 Claire Michelle De Castro

According to a survey by Dice.com, an IT career website, Java development was the most sought-after software-building skill by employers in the first quarter of 2014. Mashable also ranked Java as the top one programming language you should learn in 2014.

And just recently, tools vendor ZeroTurnaround revisited the tools & technologies landscape in Java these days and checked what’s going on in the market at large.

This year’s survey covers more than a dozen different tool/technology segments within the Java industry in general, gathering the market share, usage and developer sentiment on different developer tools—such as IDEs, Application Servers, Build Tools, Web Frameworks, DBs, Continuous Integration tools and more.

“The majority of our 2164 respondents are software developers, developing web-based applications, using Android phones and Windows,” shared Oliver White, head of Rebellabs.

Here is a full view of the Java tools & technologies leaderboard:

Java development landscape

Java development landscape

“The results of the survey are no surprise,” shared Deng Ching, a technical architect and lead developer at Exist. “In fact, here at Exist we’re using most of the tools and technologies which topped the list.”

“Yet it’s nice to see interesting data and trends such as the high interest over Java 8 and Scala topping the list of the JVM languages people want to learn more about (after Java),” added Deng.

The report also looked at the maturity (based on the size of non-user base and level/type of market fragmentation) of the different tool categories. They classified IDEs, App Servers, Web Frameworks, relational DBs (SQL) as mature technologies, with comparatively little change year-over-year.

Looking forward in 2015 — Java 8 (obviously), is on the mind of over 1/3 of developers – with some long-awaited changes, like lambda functions, finally available, there seems to have been a breath of new life inserted into this “dead” language.

Java priorities

Java priorities

As pioneers of Java application development in the country, we believe that these findings reflect a language ecosystem that is established and mature and it will remain a competitive development language for enterprise applications.

“Java certainly has been an enterprise-heavy language, it’s been used to write a lot of business applications, which don’t necessarily get developers excited, but it’s still being used to write a lot of projects that do get developers excited,” said RedMonk co-founder and analyst Stephen O’Grady.